[email protected]

ACRE: Lake Martin Voice A Good Resource

AcreWe at Lake Martin Voice Realty were very flattered to learn that the Alabama Center for Real Estate cited this blog as a good resource for market reports focused on Lake Martin waterfront properties only. They linked us in this article on AL.com.

Wow!  Thanks, ACRE!

If you have seen any sort of real estate statistics about Alabama quoted anywhere, chances are that you were reading a report from ACRE. They do a great job assimilating all of the relevant numbers, from all over the state. ACRE is based out of the University of Alabama, and, according to their website, it:

“collects, maintains and analyzes the state’s real estate statistics, and is a trusted resource for Alabama real estate research, forecasting, and professional development..”

If you read the article I linked above, you can read how they analyzed the Lake Martin Area as a whole. Those statistics encompass everything sold in our area, waterfront or not. At the end of the article, they say,”For lakefront only figures, here is good resource.” They link directly in to our Market Statistics category.
We are super excited to be considered a good resource by ACRE! Thanks again!

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New Waterfront Listings on Lake Martin

If you are interested in waterfront homes, lots, or condos for sale on Lake Martin, you might like the latest feature of LakeMartinVoice.com.

I have added a new feature called “New Listings On Lake Martin.” See the right hand column of my blog, just below the top. There is a little plugin there that brings you the very newest homes, lots and condos on the market here at Lake Martin. In some real estate markets, this is called a “Hot Sheet.” So I guess I could have called it the Lake Martin Hot Sheet. Nevertheless, it’s a quick way to check what’s new on the market here at Lake Martin.

Newest Lake Martin Real Estate Listings

My goal is to have absolutely, positively, the best website and tools for searching the Lake Martin real estate market. I feel very blessed that this site continues to be number one in traffic, usage, and most Google searches for Lake Martin property. I will continue to tinker and experiment with new features like this to try and stay number one. If you have any suggestions or ways I can improve, please email at info at lakemartinvoice.com.

FAQ about New Listings On Lake Martin

  1. Are these only your listings? No, this list comes from the Lake Martin MLS, so that includes every single agent on Lake Martin, every single brokerage. It doesn’t matter who has it listed, I can help you with it.
  2. How often is it updated? It pulls about the last seven days of new listings from the Lake Martin MLS. So, if you haven’t checked it in about a week, you may have missed some. You may want to click here to search the Lake Martin MLS to see everything.
  3. What if I want more info on a home? Just click on its thumbnail and a new page, with that listing’s complete info will appear.
  4. What if I request info through your site, or give feedback by clicking a smiley face? The system will ask you to register by giving your name and email address. That’s so I can have a way to reach you and answer your request. Don’t worry, your info only comes to me.
  5. What is your spam policy? Don’t worry, I hate spam more than you do. In fact, I spend a lot of time and money to keep my site as virus and spam free as possible. I work way too hard to gain your trust to then turn around and spam you.
  6. Is this list waterfront property only on Lake Martin? Yes, this is a search that looks at three fields in the Lake Martin MLS: Waterfront = Yes, Lake Name = Lake Martin, and Age = < 7 Days. If you click on the Property Search button under the main picture, it will show you every single active listing in our MLS, waterfront or not. To view waterfront only on that page, click on the waterfront field and select “Yes.”

If you see anything you like, or want to talk Lake Martin real estate in general, I’d love to talk to you.  Give me a call at (334) 221-5862, email me at [email protected], or click here to contact me.  Thanks!

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DIY: For Sale By Owner on Lake Martin

I once embarked on a mission to see how cheaply I could take a brown bag lunch to work.

DIY photos I brought all my accounting skills (I was a controller at the time) and all of my family traditions to bear upon the subject. I used fast food ketchup packets, bought cold cuts in bulk and stalked the “almost stale” bakery section, but I hit a wall at around $1.10 per lunch. Despite way too much thought on the subject, I could not pierce the $1.00 per lunch barrier.

One day, as I bemoaned my plateau to the rest of the office, one of the ladies suggested, “Why not re-use your bags?”

Eureka!

It was so simple. So obvious; yet, so effective. Re-using my bags and other packaging plunged my per-lunch cost to the seventy-cent range.

This leads me to my point for those who are thinking about selling a Lake Martin home. If you are the do-it-yourself type and want to go the for-sale-by-owner route, let me share a couple of Special Weapons and Tactics that we Lake Martin Realtors use. They may appear obvious, but remember the paper bag. Simple solutions can take you to new heights.

First, take your pictures with a wide-angle camera lens. If you have or can borrow an SLR camera, you can buy a wide-angle lens that will make a world of difference. The lens might cost you $500, but remember how much you are asking for your home.

I’ve read good articles on Houzz saying the opposite is true – use a regular lens and be happy capturing less square footage in the room.  For art’s sake, I agree.  But I’ve found that wide angle lenses work well in some of the funky rooms we find in lake homes.  If I can capture more space in a room with the wide angle lens, I’m going to do it.  wide angle lensBottom line, I’m neither an artsy nor accurate photographer and continue to try and learn.  If there’s anyone in the Lake Martin area who is a budding photographer and would like to practice photographing homes, let’s talk.  I’ll give you the credit, and you could help me up my photography game.

If you don’t have an SLR, and all you have is the camera on your smart phone, at least spend $50 for a wide-angle lens to put over it. Yes, no matter what kind of iPhone or Android phone you have, you can order a case to clip over it that will allow you to shoot wide angles. This is critical, because when people look at homes online, the pictures are a major way they weed out the tares from the wheat. Good quality photos can make or break your success.

Perspective is everything on home photos. Pictures look so good in magazines because professional photographers use different perspectives to present the best features of the room. Inside, a stepladder lets you point down into the room, as opposed to shooting flat across it. Try shooting some of your pictures from waist level, or from the height of a light switch on the wall.   Combine with a wide-angle lens and note the difference.

To get a nicer picture of the exterior of your home from the lake, use a taller ladder on your pier. When selling a lake home, the lakeside photo is the most important. Most Lake Martin homes are at least five feet above the dock; from dock level, you often are shooting the house at a weird, unflattering angle. Get a tall ladder and set it up on the dock; the results will be much better.

Once you master these special weapons and tactics of Lake Martin Realtors, you can move on to others, like finding a new you-just-can’t-miss-it home.

If this sounds like a lot of hassle and you’d rather have a professional do the marketing work for you, give me a call at (334) 221-5862.  You can also email me at [email protected] or click here to contact me.  I’d love to help you!

Pic from a ladder Lake Martin Vocie RealtyLake Martin Voice Realty ladder picturesDIY Real estate pictures

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The LMVR Quadcopter: Coming to a Lake Martin Slough Near You

Yes!  I bought a helicopter!  Lake Martin is a perfect place to showcase waterfront real estate from the air, so after a little research, I purchased my own helicopter so I can video my listings from all angles.

I’ve been honing my flying skills, and I finally worked up the nerve to take it to Lake Martin on Labor Day weekend.  These things are a little tricky to operate – I had to (had to!) order a flight simulator video game to get used to the feel of the controls.  And I still have a good bit of learning to do:

I already had a GoPro HERO3, so when I decided to do this, I had to do a lot of research on helicopters that could be used to carry this camera.  I found the DJI Phantom online.  Through my research I found that these are pretty easy to fly, on a relative scale.

So far I have learned two key things:

1)  Do not take it out of GPS mode without a lot more practice.  The Phantom has a mode whereby it can auto stabilize by using its GPS.  I did OK when I was in GPS mode, but when I decided to get fancy and shut the GPS off, the wind caught the quadcopter and it took off.

2)  Do not to get too high and fly into strong wind.  I just don’t think the Phantom’s motors are strong enough to battle the wind for very long.

I do, however, think that filming video from the air is going to be a great way to showcase Lake Martin waterfront real estate.  Once I get to the point where I can get usable aerial videos of Lake Martin, I think buyers and sellers will love to see this unique perspective.

If anybody out there has experience flying remote control helicopters, I’d love to meet you at the lake and learn from you.  And if you’re a waterfront home, lot or condo seller on Lake Martin and are would like your property to be the first one showcased in an aerial video tour, give me a call.  (334) 221-5862 or [email protected]

A shout out to Carlton Dean on the Scene, who is the best commercial broker in the Florida Panhandle:  You have talked a big game about your flying skills, but have yet to post a video.  Let’s see what you’ve got:)

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Love the Lot You’re With

I wrote the article below on Lake Martin waterfront lots for the April 2013 issue of LAKE Magazine.  I got a lot of positive feedback from it, and even had it quoted back to me by a client:  “John, we’ve thought about looking for a larger lake home, but I think we’re going to love the lot we’re with (and renovate).”  If you missed it in print, here goes:

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This month’s issue of LAKE magazine has a lot of great information about designing and building a home on Lake Martin. I think this is a superb idea. Not only does the lake boast many inspiring and original home designs, but we also have more than our share of talented architects, builders and subcontractors.

Love the one you're withBut with all this talk of site improvement, let’s not forget one important point when it comes to Lake Martin real estate: The lot.

That’s right, the lot. The dirt. It’s why you are here. Well, maybe not the dirt per se, but the fact that the dirt leads up to the water. It may seem obvious, but we all need to remember that the lake is what makes our real estate so valuable. The lot value is also the major driver in overall real estate value.

I see this time and again with buyers who are new to the Lake Martin market. They really have to wrap their heads around the concept that a little humble cabin on a huge lot with a big water view will likely sell for more than a newer home on a smaller lot in the back of a slough. It’s the facts. It’s market preference.

I also hear from people who want “just a little quaint cabin, a fixer upper, on a nice lot. I can do some of the work myself.” Sometimes, it takes a while for it to sink in for them that the proverbial “quaint cabin on an awesome lot” is a very popular request. Popularity equals price pressure. In our market of limited supply, price pressure always equals higher prices. Economics 101.

This rule does not limit itself to the small cabins. Even the larger waterfront homes are subject to the reign of the lot. One only needs a cursory review of county tax assessor appraised values to see that even on homes assessed above $1 million, the lot is likely greater than half of the overall value. Unless you are coming from major metro areas that have similar buyer pressure on land, that high percentage may be a shock.

I am certainly not the first real estate agent to give this advice, but I always tell waterfront home buyers, “You had better love your lot, because you can never change it.” Once again, an obvious statement; however, it is one we need to keep in mind. Most buyers work under a budget, and budgets mean tradeoffs. No two homes or lots are exactly the same, so if buyers find themselves trying to pick between two very close contenders, I always counsel them to buy the one with the lot that they like the best. They can always change everything else.

This magazine is chocked full of friendly people to help you improve or redesign everything other than the lot. On that point, be sure not to build too much house on too small of a lot if your goal is to increase your home’s overall worth. If your goal is to have fun or just to customize, go for it. I don’t want to discourage “dream home” activities, but you have to understand that every improvement may or may not increase the overall value of your real estate asset. Your particular improvement may increase value, but not necessarily. It all depends on what the market has proven that it will bear. Think about it: Would an Eskimo pay extra for an outdoor shower on the side of an igloo? Would someone living on the equator pay extra for an electrically heated, snow-and-ice-proof driveway? Not likely.

Don’t misunderstand me – I am not trying to hold you back from home improvements or building. Far from it. Just remember what we have discussed here. And if you can’t be with the lot you love, honey, love the lot you’re with.

I can help you find a lot to love, so if you’re looking at waterfront real estate on Lake Martin, give me a call at (334) 221-5862, email me at [email protected], or click here to contact me

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Lake Martin Lots Selling Hot In 2013

We humans, especially Southerners, like the art of storytelling, don’t we?

We like legends. We like to talk about the way things were back then.

For Lake Martin, 2007 will always be “The Year of the Drought.” Similarly, 2009 will be thought of as “The Year of Alan Jackson at Aquapalooza.” I have no doubt that 2013 will become “The Year of FERC Relicensing” because the potential changes in the water level rule curve will impact the next forty years.

As I study real estate trends in the waterfront market for Lake Martin in 2013, I have a hard time separating market reports from the mammoth issue of relicensing the dam. Usually, when people ask, “what’s going on at Lake Martin?” I give them a ten second market report. This year, however, I have talked about FERC.

But, if we can all forget about that for a moment, and focus solely on what’s happening in the real estate market per se, I think we find something very interesting. There is a notable trend at Lake Martin that, in my judgement, is yet another sign pointing to the overall health of our market.

The big story at Lake Martin in 2013 is waterfront lot sales.

Yes, lot sales.

Do you remember 2008? You might know it as “The Year of The Bank Crash.” For those who don’t, I can tell you that getting a loan to buy a lot in 2008, and even in subsequent years, was dang near impossible. If a bank or mortgage lender smelled, perchance even suspected that you wanted a loan on a lot, they ran the other way. If that lot was located in a subdivision that was lightly populated, well, they called Father Merrin for an exorcism.

Lake Martin waterfront lot sales 2013

Please take a look at the Waterfront Lot Sales chart. Sales are blistering. Through the end of July, there have been 37 waterfront lots sold through the Lake Martin MLS. That is only one fewer sold in all of 2012 and only two fewer sold in the 12 months of 2011. In other words, this year it only took seven months to sell as many lots that were sold in twelve in each of the two prior years. That’s growth, neighbors.

Lot sales mean construction. Construction helps the overall economy and it points to more confidence for the future. If no other lots were sold in 2013, the lake would have a good year. If 2013 lot sales continue on pace with prior years, it will be a great one.

Lake Martin Home Sales in 2013

Don’t let all this talk about lots obscure the good news about homes. Waterfront home sales on Lake Martin are once again strong in 2013. One can see from the cumulative graph attached, that as of the end of July, 2013 is running on pace with 2012. As I am sure we all remember, 2012 was the second best waterfront home sales market on record. When we look at the entire lake real estate market, with all agents, all brokerages that participate and report to the Lake Martin MLS, we see that at July 31, 2013, 139 waterfront homes have been sold. This is statistically significant to 2012. By the end of July in 2012, 140 homes have been sold. I don’t consider the one home difference to be a big deal.

Lake Martin waterfront hoem sales July 2013

The bottom line is, 2013 is another great year for Lake Martin home sales. The more interesting thing for me to consider is that such great years are becoming routine once again. Remember, 2008 was the last year of decreasing numbers of homes sold on Lake Martin. Every year since 2008, the current year has beaten the prior year’s numbers of homes sold. The market has improved.

Lake Martin home sales monthly chart July 2013

 

Lake Martin Home Prices

Whenever anyone hears the words “improved market’ – it’ s natural to wonder if prices have risen along with the home sales figures. Prices, however, have remained steady. Have prices in 2013 risen? I don’t know yet. Because Lake Martin has such a small sample pool, I only calculate price trends once a year.

However, if Lake Martin continues to beat the prior year in numbers of home sold, and supply does not out strip demand, one of these days we will see price increases. When that happens, we can call it “The Year That Prices Finally Rose.”

Note:

This article is going to appear in the September, 2013, issue of Lake Magazine. I am honored to write a monthly column on Lake Martin real estate for Lake.

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Do You Really Want a Lake Martin Fixer Upper?

Many home buyers think they do.

“Oh, we love a project,” the wife might say while the husband rolls his eyes in the background. Or a husband might wave his hand at a sagging roof and say, “I can handle this, no problem,” while the wife looks on in shock at the man who doesn’t even own a hammer.Renovation

I would venture to speak the unspoken thought of us real estate agents, and say, “Really?”

Can you really handle it? Those of you with construction experience, I will acquiesce to your judgment, but only when you realize that on Lake Martin, where so much value is in the dirt, a fixer upper can be a big project.

Plus, it’s relative. One person’s tear-it-down-and-start-over home is what I might call another person’s “tooth brusher,” as in, “It’s perfect, just bring your toothbrush.”

Whatever your self-assessment, before you buy a home that you are planning to fix up, I would put three questions before you:

First, do you have the budget?

The home improvement shows on TV fail to mention the pesky issue of budgeting. If you buy a fixer upper, you need to set aside some cash above and beyond the down payment to do the work. For instance, if you buy a home at $300,000, more than likely you would get an 80 percent loan or $240,000. That leaves about $60,000, plus closing costs, that you would need to have at closing. If you planned to spend $30,000 on renovations after you buy, that’s about $90,000 cash you need to have budgeted.

Many buyers assume they will just get their renovation budget from their lender. Perhaps this worked more easily before 2008’s taxpayer bailout of the banks. An extreme example of the old way went like this: you bought a home for $300,000; it appraised for $500,000, so at closing the bank gave you $75,000 that you used for renovations. Instead of having to bring money to closing, the bank gave you money. No more. First of all, I have not seen an appraisal come in appreciably higher than the contract price in a long, long time. Even if it did, if a buyer is getting conventional financing, the loan underwriters would have a hissy fit when they saw that the buyer was putting no money down and was walking away from closing with cash. It just doesn’t happen these days. You had better have some cash for renovations.

Secondly, do you have the patience?

Once again, the home improvement shows come into play, creating unrealistic expectations for some buyers. Sure, they show little problems here and there during the fix-up project, but these snafus are easily fixed by the home reno hero. What you don’t see is the extra money it takes and the time the project was set back by the bump in the road. Home renovations are infamous for dragging on longer than expected. Are you hiring an experienced contractor who can anticipate the potential hazards and help you navigate? Are you patient enough to expect the unexpected?

Trust me, your project will not be wrapped up in a neat 30-minute TV show schedule. Things run long. If you go into the project knowing that, you will be fine.

Lastly, do you have the time?

Time to renovateYou have gotten this far, so I assume you have passed the first two tests. You have some money set aside for the home renovation, and you have promised your contractor you will be patient during the fix up. But do you have the time to make it happen?

Remember, we are on Lake Martin. You would likely be buying a home to use during the warm months. If you have spent the spring looking around, finally settled on a home, agreed to a contract with a seller, and closed, it might be Memorial Day. Look at the calendar and start counting ahead.

If your contractor tells you it’s an eight-week job, and you factor in two more weeks to be conservative, that’s 10 weeks. Ten weeks after Memorial Day is August. Are you ready to start a project that will take two thirds of your first summer on the lake? Think about it.

True, I have made the argument that Lake Martin is more than a Memorial Day-to-Labor Day place. We have year round activities. But think twice before taking on a huge fix up project in the first 12 months you own your home. I pass along the advice of architect Bryan Jones: Live in it a year. Have fun. Learn the home. Then make a plan.

I think you will be a lot happier in the long run.

The rewarding side of fixing it up

If you have the time, money, and patience to renovate a Lake Martin home, the rewards can be huge.  Don’t think I’m against a fixer upper – not at all!  I enjoy sharing “before” and “after” pictures of clients’ renovations because it helps others see what can be done with older cabins on Lake Martin.  If you get your numbers right, you can end up with a super lake home and a solid investment.  I just finished a series on a client’s cabin reno in the Little Kowaliga / Real Island area, and I’ve followed a couple of transformations in Parker Creek.  If you missed them, here are the links:

Unveiling a Real Island Cabin Renovation

Parker Creek ReThink: Making Room for Teenage Boys

Lake Martin Dream Cabin Renovation in Parker Creek

If you’re looking for a Lake Martin cabin to renovate (or if you prefer a move-in ready home), give me a call – I’d love to be your realtor.  I can help you with any property on the Lake Martin MLS, regardless of who has it listed.  Call me at (334) 221-5862, email me at [email protected], or click here to contact me.

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Tracking the Lake Martin Homebuyer

All indications are holding true that 2013 waterfront home sales are following suit with 2012, with many homes selling. In 2012, we saw the second best year in number of homes sold, topped only by 2005.

Naturally, people are asking questions like, “Where are all these buyers coming from?” and “How did they hear about Lake Martin?”

NAR SurveyWhile the data geek in me would love to require a thorough questionnaire with every lake home purchase, alas, one does not exist. But we can infer a good amount of information by studying the next best thing: the National Association of Realtors’ Profile of Home Buyers and Sellers.

Every year, the National Association of Realtors (NAR) publishes the Profile of Home Buyers and Sellers. The Profile is the result of a 120-question survey sent to a random sample of home buyers across the nation. This year, about 8,500 surveys were returned. The results were used to compile the statistics and compare them to previous years. This survey is a heavily watched measuring stick of home buyers’ preferences and behaviors. In 2013, as in the past, this survey offered valuable insight to us at Lake Martin.

First Step: Agent vs. the World Wide Web

Since Al Gore decided to invent the Internet, there has been a battle between Joe and Jane Agent and the Web. The issue at war is deciding just who is more relevant, useful and trusted by home buyers. This war is all but over.

Winner: the Internet.

Despite NAR’s constant advertisement to the contrary, their own survey shows that buyers place much more trust in the Internet than in agents. One very interesting question the survey always asks buyers is, “What is your first step in the home buying process?”  This year, a whopping 41 percent of respondents said they looked online for properties. This is more than double those that contacted a real estate agent (18 percent). The third choice at 11 percent was, “Looked online for info on the process.” I would argue that is the same as number one. Added together, those two indicate that about 52 percent of people are looking online before they ever call an agent.

Chart 1 Coley June 2013

I do grant that potential buyers are looking on the Internet at agents’ websites. So some agents can take solace in that fact. But the lesson to be learned is that buyers looking on an agent website is an indirect contact initiated by the buyer, and it’s anonymous. The agent has no idea the website is being visited. In other words, the buyer is in complete control of the interaction. Maybe the buyer will contact the agent directly, maybe not. In either case, the buyer is driving the ship.

I do not see this trend reversing any time soon, especially considering the momentum. Last year’s survey showed that 35 percent looked online and 21 percent contacted an agent. This means the online first steppers increased by 17 percent, and the agent pickers decreased by 14 percent. Brokerages and agents that do not accept this will find themselves as outdated as the mimeograph machine.

Where Did You Find It?

Today’s world is full of resources for the home buyer. Agents, the Internet, signs, billboards, TV and more all vie for the coveted attention of those who are ready to purchase. To some buyers, I am sure it is information overload.

Considering all these channels, two other critical questions to ask are, “What worked?” and “Where did you find the home that you bought?”

Chart 2 Coley June 2013

Not surprisingly, the Internet trend continues to dominate here. The Web continues to increase in importance, with 42 percent of those surveyed responding that the Internet was where they found their home. Agents checked in with 34 percent, which I suppose is an honorable defeat; however, when you consider that it was down from 35 percent last year, and that the Web increased by two percent, the writing is on the wall.  It is clear that any serious home buyer is not waiting around for their agent to personally call and tell them about homes. Today’s home buyer is a researcher.

The Internet’s dominance in the “usefulness” category is neither new nor a secret. What should be noted is the degree to which home buyers rely on it. Nothing else is even close.

The implication is huge in that home sellers should ask detailed questions of potential agents, such as, how will my home be displayed online? How many online leads do you get, and how do you track your leads?  Similarly, home buyers by their behaviors are asking agents: What have you done for me lately?

If you’d like to know more about what Lake Martin Voice Realty can do for you, give me a call at (334) 221-5862, email me at [email protected], or click here to contact me.

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Wanted: Chain Smoking Secretary

Must be a loose director.

Apply at downtown Kowaliga, better known as 8424 Kowaliga Road, Suite A, Eclectic, Alabama.

I was inspired to make this crucial hire after I read the hilarious post entitled “Lake Cabin Fever” over at Finding Home – the blog of McAlpine Tankersley Architecture.

Photo by http://mcalpinetankersleyblog.com/

It’s the story of the construction of Bobby McAlpine’s first Lake Martin home. It’s a funny tale, which, at its heart, is an expression of love for Lake Martin.

I am tempted to make a real estate lesson out of this post, about how things have changed from not-so-long-ago, or how I wish I had a mobile real estate van, or even a sassy, brassy secretary that everyone had to endure, or gush even more about their company, one of my favorite in a very short list of favorite architecture firms, but I won’t.

Photo by http://mcalpinetankersleyblog.com

Instead I will follow the advice of Stephen King when he wrote the forward to Lord of The Flies, that, when in the presence of a masterpiece:  “just inhale first, analyze later.”

If you’ve never browsed through their blog, go forth and enjoy. It’s a Pinterest play land. They (read: Greg) do a great job with social media.

Government do take a bite

..as spoken to HI McDunnough – “Gubmint do take a bite, don’t she?”

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Shady Bay on Lake Martin: Walking the Neighborhood

Last week we at Lake Martin Voice Realty announced the release of 14 new waterfront lots for sale in Shady Bay.

Below are some pictures I took as I walked up and down these lots:

If you’re interested in Shady Bay, we invite you to walk the lots, too, but bring your bug spray and perhaps a walking stick.  These are not 100′ x 100′ feet city lots;  they’re thickly wooded with all kinds of hardwoods and pines and they slope from Amber Drive down to the water.  They are raw and untouched and ready for buyers to envision their perfect lake home.  Buyers may bring their own builder and house plans, and covered boat docks are allowed.

If you’d like more info on Shady Bay, give me a call at (334) 221-5862, email me at [email protected], or click here to fill out a contact form.  I  can help you with Shady Bay and all properties on the Lake Martin MLS, regardless of the listing company.

Here’s a quick video tour of Shady Bay:

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